Your eyes provide the best way for you to explore the world around you. As your eyes age, cataracts can start filtering what you see. Before long, that white, milky film begins to impede your vision, making it difficult to do much of anything.

You may consider having cataract surgery, during which the doctor replaces your damaged and cloudy lens with a new one. Before scheduling an appointment, you may want to explore some of the risks of the procedure.

  1. Fragmented lens

Sometimes during surgery, a lens may fracture into pieces. When this happens, the fragments can scratch the eye and get stuck. The larger the particle, the more irritating and dangerous it is. Your doctor may not know the extent of the lens breakage and some of the smaller pieces may get left behind. If you feel a burning sensation or like something is in your eye, tell your doctor immediately. You may require another procedure.

  1. Infection

Removing the old lens requires an incision to cut it out. The incision will heal over time with care; however, if germs take up residence there, it could spell big trouble. Getting an eye infection is no laughing matter. While your doctor may prescribe antibiotics to clean it up, ongoing issues may result. If you notice that your eye stays red long after surgery, or tears up easily, you may have an infection.

  1. Detached retina

Your retina processes light and resides in the back of your eye. During surgery, it can detach from the eyeball, which may cause blindness if not treated immediately. After surgery, it is imperative that you report any change in vision or light to the doctor as soon as you experience it.

Cataract surgery is a fairly common procedure performed each day in Illinois. If you choose to proceed with the surgery, stay vigilant and report anything odd to your doctor immediately. Do not lose one of your most precious senses to a medical mishap.